In pictures: A rainbow of colours

The bus dropped us off in a square with a fountain depicting slavery and a monument to celebrate the naval battle of Lepanto that took place on 7th October 1571 when a fleet of the Holy League, a coalition of Catholic maritime states, decisively defeated the main fleet of the Ottoman Empire.

Marino was clearly not a tourist town but instead a traditional Italian living and working town with shabby narrow streets, brightly colour washed buildings with washing lines strung outside windows and across the streets and little shops and small bars.  In the heat the atmosphere was slow and lazy and no one appeared to be rushing to do anything very much at all.  The greatest activity was at the bottom of the hill where there was a small market with a few stalls selling fruit and vegetables where there was a bit of trade but a lot more conversation.

We returned to the square on the main road where, although we couldn’t be certain because there was no timetable, we estimated that if buses ran every hour from Frascati then one would be due in twenty minutes or so from now so we found a bar with a clear view of the road where we could keep look out and ordered some drinks from a waitress who seemed surprised to see tourists in town on this Tuesday morning.

A couple of blue and white buses came and went but these were not ours and twenty minutes came and went and we began to wonder if we had guessed correctly as a further ten minutes passed by and we started looking around for a taxi rank.  The waitress had no idea of bus times so we waited a few minutes longer and then finally a bus for Albano came along the main road and we hailed it to stop and jumped on board back to the town.

14 responses to “In pictures: A rainbow of colours

  1. Hey! Where’s the text? I expect a decent early morning read from you!!

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    • I’ve decided to join in these photo challenges that keep circulating! I had a curious statistic yesterday – 431 hits from the Lebanon and all in the space of two hours! What do you think that might be about?

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      • You must have read my rant about boring old photoblogs 😀 If you are going to do that you need to set up another blog! You haven’t really got many until you have a handful anyway.

        Lebanon huh? School project? No, it was Sunday! Nope, can’t help there. Mis-keyed url? 😀

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  2. Hi,
    Well it is colourful I suppose, I mean what can you say about pegs? I agree with roughseasinthemed, it is not what I expect when I open your blog. 😀

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  3. Yep! Not used to text less posts from you! The 400+ hits are kind of standard on the weekly challenge day 🙂 Lovely clothes pegs!

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  4. Andrew,
    Good morning.
    I just LOVE the order of colour in which you placed the clothes pegs!
    Kindest, as ever,
    Dai

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  5. An unusual and inventive composition,Andrew !!!
    It is sort of an artistic expression … We don’t always need to stick to the ordinary.I enjoyed it for the very simple reason that it was not “you”.
    You made your revolution …
    BTW,do you enjoy The Corfu Trilogy ?
    B,
    Doda

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    • Thank you for the comment. I spotted these pegs on a balcony on the island of Milos. I have barely started the Corfu trilogy because I am reading a fascinating book called ‘Inside Hitler’s Greece’ which tells the story of the occupation.

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  6. Thanks Andrew.
    Stay well

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  7. Very cute! And colorful.

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  8. Colourful composition of clothes pins.

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  9. Pingback: Naples, Washing Lines | Have Bag, Will Travel

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