Early Days, 1957 Part Three – The BBC Spaghetti Tree Hoax

aprilfoolspaghetti1

By 1957 most people were beginning to get television sets in the home and on 1st April the BBC broadcast one of its most famous ever programmes; a spoof documentary about spaghetti crops in Switzerland.

The Panorama programme, narrated by the normally deadly serious journalist Richard Dimbleby, featured a family from Ticino in Switzerland carrying out their annual spaghetti harvest.

Read the Full Story…

18 responses to “Early Days, 1957 Part Three – The BBC Spaghetti Tree Hoax

  1. Love the sense of humour.. 😉

    Like

  2. Such a classic, I bet the world knows about it! I remember reading about the spaghetti tree prank decades ago. Still a hoot!

    Like

  3. I still think that’s one of the better April 1st hoaxes!

    Like

  4. Having said that, when I read about Dimbleby’s hoax in my teens, I didn’t have the faintest idea where spaghetti came from, (although trees seemed a bit bizarre.)
    It occurred to me as well that Brexit was an April Fool’s joke, but that’s slightly wrong. It’s democracy that’s the April Fool’s joke. You can have democracy as long as you make the right decision. And as for abiding by the majority decision when you’ve lost, well, as the spoilt brat said on many occasions, “You cannot be serious!!”.

    Like

    • This years Council Tax bill is another April Fool’s joke. Tory Government switching tax burden from central to local government and then taking the credit for tax cuts. They take us for complete fools!

      Like

  5. good to know about the spaghetti could still be used today! But 1957 oof not even born yet lol!!!

    Like

  6. Wasn’t there an annual spoof on Nationwide or something like that?

    Like

  7. I almost think I remember this, even though I couldn’t possibly. It must be the stuff of legends.

    Like

  8. Hope you weren’t April fooled today, Andrew? 🙂 🙂 And please don’t mention that B thingy!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.