In The Garden Today – The Tulips

Tulip 001

The name Tulip was first applied to the plant by a man called Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq who was a Dutch ambassador in Turkey in the sixteenth century and was also a great floral enthusiast.  One day he was talking to a sultan and he noticed that he was wearing an attractive flower in his headwear.

When I say talking what I mean is that they were communicating with each other in the way that people do when they can’t speak each other’s language with lots of funny faces and wild gesticulations.

Busbecq was curious about the flower and pointed to it and enquired its name.  In Turkey the name of the flower was a Lale but the Sultan thought he meant what is the name of his hat so he told him it was a Tulipan or turban and Busbeqc, who completely misunderstood, acquired some bulbs and sent them back to Europe with the information that they were called Tulipa.

A good job that he wasn’t wearing a pork pie hat or tulips would be porkies!

Now, this is important information in case we run out of food during the lock down…

All parts of tulips are edible and the bulb can be substituted for onions (although they are a little more expensive and less flavourful). The Dutch ate tulip bulbs in the hard times of WW2 even though the petals have little taste but can be used to garnish a dish, chop a few petals and throw them in a salad, sugar them to decorate a cake or use the entire flower for a fruit bowl, pinching out the pistil and stamen in the middle.

Click on an image to scroll through the Gallery…

35 responses to “In The Garden Today – The Tulips

  1. Splendid pics and potentially useful information 🙂

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  2. Tulips are my favourite flower. Thanks for the info on how they were named. Gorgeous pictures!

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  3. Are these all from your garden? What a display!

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  4. The only thing I don’t like about them is they don’t last long and you then have to wait for them to go brown before cutting them down.

    I like the parrot tulips the best.

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  5. Never too old to learn a new fact – thanks for that information. I shall file it away in that part of my mind that hoards trivia to drag out and impress at the right time.

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  6. I never knew how tulips got their name, but I do know that they used to be incredibly expensive. See my post https://operasandcycling.com/the-tulip-girls/

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  7. Interesting story on the beautiful tulip!

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  8. No wonder I can’t keep tulips very here unless I plant them in gravel! The local rodents eat them.

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  9. Lovely photos. Happy Easter

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  10. “Porkies”! LOL! I needed a laugh today, and that served me well.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I do hope it doesn’t come to that! I’d rather look at them than eat them. Beautiful specimens.

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  12. We’re still on daffodils. 750 feet above sea level.

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  13. Beautiful, no, VERY beautiful photos!. And the history of the name is fantastic, and what a great piece of history to know.

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  14. I had no idea that tulips were edible. Will try some as a decorative element sometime. I’m not growing any, but my neighbours are… hehehe

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  15. One nice thing about staying at home all the time is when you have a garden at home and it’s Springtime. Cheers for small victories.

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