Tag Archives: Marco Polo

A to Z of Windows – K is for Korcula in Croatia

The ferry docked efficiently just outside the medieval city and we drove the short distance to the old town and after a bit of parking confusion found a perfect spot just outside the harbour and we set off to explore.  Immediately it was obvious that Korčula isn’t very big and so, because we had all day there pencilled in for tomorrow, we decided not to do too much of it today.

We walked around the outside of the town and restricted ourselves to the main street that runs through the middle and then found a pizzeria with a table overlooking the sea and the Pelješac peninsular.  We choose a speciality pizza and the waiter asked if we wanted it cutting into six or eight slices, we said six because it was a big pizza and we didn’t think we could manage eight.

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Marco Polo

Korcula

It was a disappointing start to the day with a lot of low cloud about so we prepared our breakfast and sat on the balcony and scanned the horizon in all directions looking for signs of improvement.  There was some blue sky to the south and the west but the cloud simply wouldn’t shift from over the island of Korčula.

The problem appeared to be that over the water on the peninsular there was a thousand metre high peak that the incoming cloud just couldn’t seem to get past and the grey lump just seemed to keep on growing as it sucked in more and more passing cumulus to add to the problem.

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Korčula, The Croatian Island of Marco Polo

Korcula

Booking a ticket for the six-kilometre crossing was very straightforward and didn’t involve the same administrative arrangements of providing passenger names that there are in Greece.  I suppose that because Croatia isn’t in the European Union yet then it can safely manage without some of its bureaucratic procedures.  The ferryboat was part of the Jadrolinija fleet, which is the largest in Croatia and carries nearly ten million passengers a year.  It was called the Sveti Krševan, which is the name of the beautiful Romanesque church in Zadar that we had visited the previous year.

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