Tag Archives: Moulay Idriss

Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside

Mosque Fez Morocco

Inside the Mosque

The Mosque wasn’t open for business at this time but we wouldn’t have been allowed in even if it had because non-believers are forbidden from entering a Muslim Mosque at any time.

In another post I wrote about how we were unwelcome in the holy city of Moulay Idriss, so much so that Abdul, the taxi driver wouldn’t stop for even a moment or two for a sightseeing walk through the intriguing streets but there were other exclusion zones in both Fez and Meknes.  These were the Mosques and although we could look through the open doors and windows we were certainly not allowed to step over the threshold.

I find this difficult to understand, apparently even the prophet Muhammad invited Christians to pray in a mosque before meeting with them but it seems that attitudes have changed and intolerance has become an unwelcome religious characteristic.  I am forced to compare this with our own balanced approach which certainly (I hope) wouldn’t exclude a visitor of a different faith to the UK entering, for example, Westminster Abbey or any other religious building.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Beyond

Mosque Fez Morocco

Beyond The Doors – The Forbidden Mosque

The Mosque wasn’t open for business at this time but we wouldn’t have been allowed in even if it had because non-believers are forbidden from entering a Muslim Mosque at any time.

In another post I wrote about how we were unwelcome in the holy city of Moulay Idriss, so much so that Abdul, the taxi driver wouldn’t stop for even a moment or two for a sightseeing walk through the intriguing streets but there were other exclusion zones in both Fez and Meknes.  These were the Mosques and although we could look through the open doors and windows we were certainly not allowed to step over the threshold. 

I find this difficult to understand, apparently even the prophet Muhammad invited Christians to pray in a mosque before meeting with them but it seems that attitudes have changed and intolerance has become an unwelcome religious characteristic.  I am forced to compare this with our own balanced approach which certainly (I hope) wouldn’t exclude a visitor of a different faith to the UK entering, for example, Westminster Abbey or any other religious building.